National Collegiate Wushu Tournament Rules

This page functions as a source that compiles all the rule sets utilized by National Collegiate Wushu Tournament for easier viewing.

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What official rule sets do we use? 

  1. Collegiate Wushu Tournament Rules - A set of tournament-specific rules which outlines competitor eligibility, experience level requirements, team competition rules, all-around champion rules, and groupset rules. link
  2. United States Wushu Union (USWU) rules - All individual events at this tournament are judged using USWU 2002 rules and 2004 rules addendum unless otherwise specified i.e. nandu events. link1 | link2
  3. International Wushu Federation (IWUF) rules  - IWUF rules are used ONLY for the three nandu events (nandu changquan, nandu nanquan, nandu taijiquan). link

What are the rules then?


1. Eligibility

CONTENTS:

  1. Eligibility
  2. Proof of Enrollment


I. ELIGIBILITY

Class 1 Competitors: As a student in a North American university or college, an undergraduate has five years to use four years of Class 1 eligibility starting from the first year of participation in the Collegiate Wushu Tournament. Full-time graduate students are limited by the 5 for 4 restriction. Eligibility is limited to:

  1. Current full-time* undergraduates.
  2. Current full-time* graduate students.
  3. Current part-time* undergraduates working towards degree.
  4. Fall graduates of current academic year. The last semester/quarter has to be spent working toward major/graduation requirements if taking a reduced course load.

Class 2 Competitors: Should a competitor not be Class 1 eligible, he/she is Class 2 eligible only if affiliated with a North American university or college and is a

  1. Non-enrolled student is a student who is pursuing a degree but is not enrolled for classes for the current term (ex. a college student who is not enrolled for Spring 2012 classes, someone taking the spring semester off).
  2. One-year alumnus is defined as having been a student (part time or full time) working towards a degree one year or less from the date of the competition.
  3. Undergraduates who are no longer Class 1 eligible.
  4. Part-time graduate student working towards degree.
  5. International students who are currently attending a North American university or college.

*Current full-time or part-time is defined as having the status of full-time or part-time student at the university ON DAY of the tournament.


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II. PROOF OF ENROLLMENT

Class 1 Competitors: Proof of current enrollment is required and must be sent in with registration materials before the competition. Student ID alone does not qualify as proof of enrollment

The proof of enrollement may consist of:

  1. an approved study list,
  2. transcript, or
  3. research curriculum

The proof must indicate the following:

  1. Date, semester, or quarter for which it applies
  2. Indicate that student is taking at least minimum number of credits to qualify as full-time

Class 2 Competitors: Documentation is also required for Class 2 competitors, in the form of  a photocopy of the competitor's diploma (for alumnus) or formal document from the  university's registrars office, such as a transcript for a previous term (for non-enrolled  students). Both the name and date should be visible on any such documentation and the printed date of enrollment or graduation will be the date used for determining eligibility.


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2. Awards

1. Individual Event Competition: 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place

Medals will be given for each competition event. These will be given based solely on score, and is independent of Class Eligibility, All-Around Competition, and Team Competition.

2. All-Around Competition: Male/Female External, Male/Female Internal Champions

Any qualified Class 1 competitor of advanced skill level can compete for one of the four All-Around Champion titles (See section on All-Around Champions)

3. Team Competition: 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place

Qualified teams comprised solely of Class 1 competitors can compete for the team title (See section on Team Competition).


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3. Skill Level

CONTENTS

  1. Skill Level Determination
  2. Form Restrictions Based on Skill Level


I. SKILL LEVEL DETERMINATION

Skill levels will include three divisions, based on the number of years of Wushu training and experience:

  • Beginner (0 to 1 year)
  • Intermediate (1 to 3 years)
  • Advanced ( 3+ years)
The skill level of a competitor is determined by total years since they began practicing Chinese Wushu (of any type), not by time spent learning a particular event. Breaks taken from training (semesters off, etc) are not subtracted from years of experience (i.e. if you started 3 years ago, you are Intermediate even if you've taken a year off of Wushu).

Competitors must compete at a consistent skill level throughout the course of the entire tournament (i.e. one cannot compete in Intermediate changquan and also Beginner broadsword).

Violation of these rules are grounds for disqualification, which can also disqualify that competitor's team from the team competition (see Disqualification section).


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II. FORM RESTRICTIONS BASED ON SKILL LEVEL

The following restrictions will be placed on forms based on skill level:

Beginner

  1. Only linear forms will be allowed.
  2. Maximum of two jumping techniques allowed from the following: jumping front kick, jumping inside crescent kick, and jumping outside crescent kick.
  3. For jumps, you cannot land on the jumping leg.
  4. No aerials, splits, or any other B level move.

Intermediate

  1. No butterfly twists, aerial twists, or any jumping technique with a 540 or greater degree of rotation.

Advanced

  1. There are no form restrictions for advanced level forms.

Deductions: There will be a 0.3 deduction for a competitor every time he or she does not comply with the restrictions for Beginner and Intermediate levels. The points will be deducted from the final score for each deviation.


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4. All-Around Champions

CONTENTS

  1. Definitions and Requirements
  2. Criteria and Methods for Scoring


I. DEFINITIONS AND REQUIREMENTS

The basic requirements for qualifying for All-Around Champion titles are the following:

  1. Class 1 eligibility
  2. Advanced skill level

Each competitor may only register for one All-Around title per tournament and they must specify prior to tournament day. The event requirements for qualifying for All-Around Champion titles are the following:

External All-Around Champion

  1. One event must be Changquan or Nanquan
  2. One event must be an external weapon form.
  3. Any other external form not counted in 1 and 2
  4. Any other form not counted in 1, 2, and 3

Internal All-Around Champion

  1. One event must be an Internal bare-hand form
  2. One event must be an Internal weapon form
  3. Any other internal event not counted in 1 and 2

*If no competitor is eligible for an All-Around title, that title will not be given.


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II. CRITERIA AND METHODS FOR SCORING

The All-Around champions will be determined by their placements in their qualifying events and each placement is designated a point value as follows:

  1. First Place - 3 points
  2. Second Place - 2 points
  3. Third Place - 1 points
  4. 4th and Below - 0 points

*If the competitor has more than the minimum event requirements, the event(s) that has the best placement is used to determine the score.


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5. Team Competition

CONTENTS

  1. Definition and Requirements
  2. Criteria and Methods of Scoring


I. DEFINITION AND REQIREMENTS

The defintion and requirements of a team qualifying for team compeition are the following:

  1. A team participating in the Team Competition consists of 6 competitors determined during registration for the tournament
  2. All competitors must be eligible class 1 competitors at the same University or College
  3. No more than 3 teams may be sent from the same university
  4. No more than 3 competitors competing in beginner level individual competition will be allowed to register on the same team.

*If a team does not meet the above requirements, the team is not eligible to place in Team Competition or Group Set. An ineligible team may still compete in Group Set for a score, but will not be considered for placement in Team Competition or Group Set.


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II. CRITERIA AND METHODS OF SCORING

Team Score

The following system will be used for scoring for Team Competition. There are two components to a team's total score:

  1. Group Set Placement, PLUS
  2. Individual Placement of Each Team Member

The team with the highest total team score will be the winning team. 

*Tiebreaker: In the event of a tie in the Team score, the team with the most first Team Placements (of all events competed by the team members) will win. If the tie still remains, the team with the most second "Team Placements" will win.

1. Group Set Placement

The following points are awarded to the team based on their placement in the Group Set Event:

  1. First Place - 6 points
  2. Second Place - 4 points
  3. Third Place - 2 points
  4. 4th and Below - 1 point

2. Individual Placement of Each Team Member aka "Team Placements"

The following points are awarded to each team member for their two best events based on their placement in the event considering only competitors participating in the team competition. For example, if a class 2 competitor places first in an event, the "team placement" for first goes to the next competitor that is partaking in the team competition.

  1. First Place - 3 points
  2. Second Place - 2 points
  3. Third Place - 1 points
  4. 4th and Below - 0 point

In other words, the maximum amount of points each team member can contribute to the team score is 6 points.


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6. Group Set Event

CONTENTS

  1. Definition
  2. Time Limits
  3. Criteria and Methods of Scoring
  4. Group Set Addendum


I. DEFINITION

Teams must compete in the group set event with all 6 team members.

Deductions: a 1 point deduction will be taken for each team member above or below the required 6 members. Registered team members cannot be replaced with non-team members to avoid the deduction.


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II. TIME LIMITS 

Teams will be judged only on the content performed within the time counted.

Teams will begin by saluting the judges when called and walking onto the performance area to set up their initial positions. The timer will start upon the first coordinated movement by the team after they have set up in the performance area. Teams will end their performance by saluting the judges. The timer will end upon the group completing the final salute.

The time limits are as following:

  • Minimum: 1 minute
  • Maximum: 3 minutes

*At the discretion of the head judge, a group set may be stopped for going over time for more than 30 seconds.

Deductions: Going under or over time will result in a 0.1 deduction for every 5 seconds, rounding up, that the limit is breached (e.g. 2 seconds over time results in a 0.1 deduction, 10 seconds over time results in a 0.2 deduction, 11 seconds over time results in a 0.3 deduction).


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III. CRITERIA AND METHODS OF SCORING

  1. General Method of Scoring
  2. Breaking Ties
  3. Scoring Criteria for Group Set Event

The Group Set event is judged and scored as following:

A. General Method of Scoring

The maximum possible points for a team in the group set event is 10.0, which consist of three subscores:

  1. Technical Execution of Techniques: 4.0 points
  2. Coordination of Movements/Formation of Group: 3.0 points
  3. Performance, Choreography, and Difficulty: 3.0 points
Each subscore will be determined by a panel of three judges. The three judges in each panel will assign individual scores for their panel, which will be averaged into the subscore for their panel's category. Any additional deductions will be taken from the sum of the three subscores to arrive at the team's final score.


B. Breaking Ties

  1. In the event of a tie between groups, the following tie-break procedure will be used.
    1. The group set with the higher technical execution subscore shall be placed higher
    2. If the tie remains, the group set with the higher coordination subscore shall be placed higher
    3. If the tie remains, the group set with the lowest variance between the individual judges' scores in the technical execution subscore shall be placed higher
    4. If the tie remains, the group set with the lowest variance between the individual judges' scores in the coordination subscore shall be placed higher
    5. If the tie remains, the group set with the higher lowest technical execution individual judge score shall be placed higher
    6. If the tie remains, the group set with the higher lowest coordination individual judge score shall be placed higher
  2. If the tie cannot be broken by any of the above methods, the tied group sets shall share the place, with the next place left vacant. So if the tied group sets are tied for first place, the next place awarded to the next competitor down will be third.

C. Scoring Criteria for Group Set Event

  1. Technical Execution of Techniques: 4 points
  2. Coordination of Movements/Formation of Group: 3 points
  3. Performance, Choreography, and Difficulty: 3 points
  4. Additional Deductions

The maximum points for the Group Set event is 10.0. The criteria for evaluation and deduction are as follows:

  1. Technical Execution of Techniques: 4 points
    1. This category applies to the stances, body positions, punching/striking techniques, footwork, body work, kicking and leg techniques, jumps, balances, and weapon techniques (as applicable) in the group set.
    2. This includes the technical execution of movements performed during a fight set component, if the group set includes one.
    3. Each style of movement included in the group set can incur separate deductions for deviations from correct technique.
    4. The proper execution techniques by all of the members will be considered in aggregate when determining the appropriate level of deductions based on how they impact the overall quality of movement of the group set. For example, a slightly high stance by one member may be considered a slight deviation but an slightly high stance by multiple members may be an apparent or severe deviation, while a single member not in a proper stance at all may be an apparent or severe deviation.
    5. The deductions for improper techniques are as follows
      1. Each occurrence of a slight deviation from correctness in any of the above areas shall result in a 0.05 point deduction.
      2. Each occurence of an apparent deviation from correctness shall result in a 0.10 point deduction.
      3. Each occurrence of a serious deviation from correctness shall result in a 0.20 point deduction.
      4. The overall deduction shall not exceed 0.20 point for more than one error in the same movement, nor for repeated occurrence of the same habitual error.
    6. This category also applies to the loss of balance or stumbles by the members of the group set:
      1. Each loss of balance, indicated by sway of the body or superfluous step or skip, shall result in a deduction of 0.1 points.
      2. Repeated occurrences of loss of balance shall result in cumulative deductions.
      3. A loss of balance accompanied by a competitor touching the ground to support himself shall result in a deduction of 0.2 points
      4. A loss of balance resulting in a fall to the ground shall result in a deduction of 0.3 points
    7. This category also applies to the loss or breakage of weapons by the members of the group set:
      1. Each occurrence of a weapon inappropriately touching a competitor's body or the floor, a weapon coming loose from a competitor's hand shall result in a deduction of 0.1 point.
      2. Each occurrence of a weapon becoming obviously bent o deformed shall result in a deduction of 0.2 points.
      3. Each occurrence of a weapon breaking or falling to the ground shall result in a deduction of 0.3 points.
    8. This category also applies to uniform malfunctions affecting members of the group set.
      1. Each occurrence of a competitor's body getting caught or entangled by the flags of their broadsword or the tassel of their sword, so as to affect their movements, shall result in a deduction of 0.1 point.
      2. Each occurrence of a weapon or garment decoration falling off in the course of competition shall result in a deduction of 0.1 point.
      3. Each occurrence of a uniform tearing, sash falling off, top coming open, shoe falling off, etc. shall result in a deduction of 0.1 point.
    9. The f, g, and h category deductions shall not apply to falls, loss weapons, or uniform changes that are intentionally performed.
  2. Coordination of Movements/Formation of Group: 3 points
    1. Timing refers to multiple elements of coordination among group members
      1. Members doing the same movements in unison.
      2. Members doing complementary movements in unison.
      3. Sequential individual movements (e.g. cascading movement) being done with a consistent or appropriate rhythm.
      4. Attacks, defenses, and other movements must be coordinated during a fight set component if the group set includes one.
    2. Positioning refers to the spatial coordination of the members of group set
      1. The group set formations should be well positioned and precise. Group set members should be evenly spaced and maintain good lines or curves in their formations as required.
      2. There should not be excessive amount of time where there are individual members separated from the group or otherwise not participating in the group set. This is determined by the extent to which the separation of members disrupts the overall structure and flow of the group set.
    3. Deductions shall be assigned as follows:
      1. Each occurrence of a slight deviation from correctness in any of the above areas shall result in a 0.05 point deduction.
      2. Each occurence of a serious deviation from correctness shall result in a 0.1 point deduction.
      3. There is no limit for the number of deductions made for timing and positioning.
  3. Performance, Choreography, and Difficulty: 3 points
    1. Performance refers to stage presence and rhythm:
      1. Stage presence is the expression of martial intent through focus and intensity of the eyes as well as the ability of the group members to command attention during the routine. This includes the realistic execution of a fight set component if it is included.
      2. Rhythm is the control of the pace at which individual movements are performed. Each movement should be performed at the correct pace, whether slow or fast; pauses and accelerations should be distinctly displayed.
    2. Choreography refers to content and structure
      1. Content refers to the variety of techniques displayed within a routine. A routine should display a wide variety of techniques using all parts of the body.
      2. Structure is the the cohesive flow from one movement or technique to the next and the arrangement of the routine within the competition area. The routine should transition smoothly and logically from one movement to the next, and not seem forced or awkward. A routine should make use of the majority of the competition space. If the group set includes a fight set component, the fight should progress in a cohesive manner.
    3. Difficulty accounts for the overall difficulty of the performing the included techniques and coordinating the movements of the group. More points will be awarded for a more difficult routine. However, movements executed incorrectly shall not be considered when assigning points for difficulty and will not contribute to a group's difficulty score. Group sets should include techniques and choreography appropriate for the skill level of their members.
    4. A subscore of 0.0 to 2.0 shall be awarded for the performance and choreography of the group set. The subscore shall be assigned as follows:
      1. A slight or occasional lack in one or two of stage presence, rhythm, content, and structure should result in a subscore of 1.5 to 2.0.
      2. An apparent or more frequent lack in one or two of the above elements, or a slight lack in three or more elements, should result in a subscore of 1.0 to 1.5.
      3. A serious or repeated lack of one or two of the above elements elements, or an apparent lack in three or more elements should result in a subscore of 0.5 to 1.0.
      4. A serious or repeated lack of three or more of the above elements should result in a should result in a subscore of 0.0 to 0.5.
    5. A subscore of 0.0 to 1.0 shall be awarded for the difficulty of the set. The subscore shall be assigned as follows:
      1. A score of 0.0 to 0.4 is a beginner level group set
      2. A score of 0.4 to 0.7 is an intermediate level group set
      3. A score of 0.7 to 1.0 is an advanced level group set
  4. Additional deductions
    1. Time limit: Going under or over time will result in a 0.1 deduction for every 5 seconds, rounding up, that the limit is breached (e.g. 2 seconds over time results in a 0.1 deduction, 10 seconds over time results in a 0.2 deduction, 11 seconds over time results in a 0.3 deduction).
    2. Team members: a 1 point deduction will be taken for teach team member above or below the required 6 members. Registered team members cannot be replaced with non-team members to avoid the deduction.

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IV. GROUP SET ADDENDUM

The elements of a group set include the quality of execution of wushu techniques, moving in  a coordinated and complimentary manner, and how well the choreography exhibits the aggregate strengths of the team members. 

Technical Execution

A group set must correctly execute all of the included movements. As with individual  forms, the competitors must perform the group set utilizing proper wushu techniques. This refers both to the taolu movements as well as movements during a fight set. For example, a group set that includes both changquan and nanquan must correctly execute both styles of movement. Similarly, in a fight set a weak punch done with the intent of being a feint is considered a correct movement while the same punch done with the intent of knocking the opponent over is an incorrectly executed punch. When deciding whether to include more advanced techniques into a group set, groups should hold themselves to the same quality of movement standards as they would for individual events. 

Coordination

Group set routines a coordinated such that all six members of the group contribute to the overall performance. Members should coordinate both the timing and spacing of their movements. Timing refers to doing the same or complementary movements in unison, doing movements with a consistent or otherwise appropriate rhythm, and (if included) performing reasonably timed attacks and defenses during a fight set. For example, all six members performing a standing jump outside kick should be coordinated in some fashion - take off and land at the same time, have individual members go in sequence at an appropriate rhythm, have three members go in unison and then have the second set go, or some other way of coordinating the movement. 

Similarly, when groups are performing movements, the positioning of each member should be coordinated. The group set formations should be well positioned and precise. Group set members should be evenly spaced and maintain good lines or curves in their formations as required. For example, a standard three by two box formation should feature evenly spaced members and straight lines, while a hexagonal or circular formation should feature evenly spaced members. 

Finally, a group set should not have an excessive amount of time where individual members are separated from the group or otherwise not participating in the group set. A group set is a coordinated performance involving the simultaneous movement of multiple members, not merely a sequence of individual performances. 

Performance

A group set must feature proper performance elements by the members. As defined in the technical section of the rules, 'stage presence is the expression of martial intent through focus and intensity of the eyes as well as the ability of the group members to command attention during the routine.' Identically executed movements can have massively different degrees of martial intent based on the expression of the competitor. Similarly, rhythm is the control of the pace at which individual movements are performed. Each movement should be performed at the correct pace, whether slow or fast; pauses and accelerations should be distinctly displayed. As in individual events, movements in a group set should be performed with the appropriate rhythm for the style of movement. For instance, the distinct rhythms of southern movements versus longfist movements should be executed accordingly. 

Unique to the group set is the ability of a group to include elements such as having a unifying theme or style of their performance in ways that are unavailable in individual forms. Examples of this include the use of pop culture references, acting or storytelling during the performance, or non-traditional costumes. These are elements that, while not appropriate for individual events, can be successfully integrated into a group set without meriting deductions. However, these elements should not distract or detract from the wushu that should be the primary focus of the group set. Groups will not score additional points for utilizing non-wushu related performance elements. 

Choreography

Choreography refers to wushu content and how it is structured within a group set. The content of a group set is defined as the techniques displayed within the routine. As with individual forms, group sets should include a wide variety of techniques that utilize all parts of the body. The included content should highlight the skill of the competitors, both individually and as a whole. Unlike individual forms, group sets can include different wushu styles within the performance--a mix of hand forms and weapons is permitted and allows a group set more opportunity to showcase their abilities. 

However, more content is not always better; the members must be able to successfully  perform and demonstrate their understanding of the included content. Issues such as executing weapon basics incorrectly, having inappropriate tempo and rhythm for different styles of hand forms, or performing a fight set at excessively slow speeds without appropriate application are all indications that a group set has failed to include content appropriate for the members. Particular care should be taken when deciding whether to include a fight set--including a fight set is not required. Groups that decide to include a fight set should utilize wushu duilian/stage fighting techniques and execute it with the appropriate believability and intensity. 

For example, a group set that is mostly composed of beginner and intermediate level competitors might reasonably include intermediate level longfist combinations and beginner level weapon or other hand form movements. Such a group attempting to include more advanced longfist combinations, multiple weapon or hand form styles, or IWUF nandu movements would likely be unable to successfully execute the included content. A group that is composed of all intermediate or advanced competitors can and should strive to include more content, but again with the caveat that they must be able to demonstrate their understanding of the techniques that they include. 

Structure is defined as the cohesive flow from one movement or technique to the next and the arrangement of the routine within the competition area. A routine should make use of the majority of the competition space. This is heavily dependent on the content of a group set; the more content, the more care must be taken on the order of that content. Switching formations, changing directions, using deliberate pauses, and varying the duration of combinations are all (but not the only) examples of how to structure the content within a group set. The group set should transition smoothly and logically from one movement to the next. 

For example, a group set that includes both longfist and southern fist movements should take care to structure the movements appropriately. A longfist combination that abruptly ends with a southern fist movement would be an abrupt and jarring transition between the styles, while having a sequence where three members perform a longfist combination and three members perform a complementary southern fist combination would be a more successful integration of the styles.


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7. All Individual Events

**These rules are copied from USWU 2002 Rules and 2004 Rules Addendum unless otherwise specified.

CONTENTS

  1. Costumes/Uniforms
  2. Weapons
  3. Time Limits
  4. Criteria and Methods of Scoring


I. COSTUMES/UNIFORMS

Specifications

  1. Tops may be either tournament or event T shirts, or traditional jackets of any Chinese style and material.
  2. T shirts shall be tucked into the pants, except in internal-style events, where this is optional.
  3. Pants shall be long and either gathered or open at the ankles
  4. A sash or belt must be worn (no karate-style belts), except in internal style events, where the sash is optional.
  5. Martial arts style athletic shoes must be worn by all forms competitors. These shoes should be stable and flexible at the ankle and toe, and should have a low profile and good traction.
  6. Uniforms should be clean and wrinkle free at the start of the competition.
  7. *For the Annual National Collegiate Tournament, uniforms bearing club logos are permitted to be worn by competitors while they are performing.

Deductions for Non-Conformity of Costumes

  1. With the exception of the deductions set out in sections b. and c. below, cumulative deductions of 0.05 shall be made by the Chief Judge for each nonconformity in costuming.
  2. Performers who are barefoot will have 0.10 subtracted from their final scores by the Chief Judge.
  3. A performer whose costume is obviously not of a Chinese martial arts style , for example, wearing a karate-style gi, shall have a total of 0.20 subtracted from the final score by the Chief Judge.

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II. WEAPONS

Specifications for Standard Weapons

  1. Spear (Qiang)
    1. The spear shall have a metal tip and shall be fitted with a horsehair tassel.
    2. The whole length shall be no shorter than the height of the performers' wrist when he stands erect with his arm raised straight overhead.
  2. Staff and Southern Staff (Gun and Nangun)
    1. Staffs may only have one end tapered - staffs with both ends tapered (such as 'bo' staffs) are not permitted.
    2. The whole length of the staff/southern staff shall not be shorter than the performer's height.
  3. Sword (Jian)
    1. The weapon shall be a single-hand, double-edged straight sword.
    2. The point of the sword shall not be shorter than the bottom of the performer's ear when the sword is held by the guard.
    3. For contemporary external and contemporary internal events only: a tassel shall be attached to the pommel of the weapon.
    4. For classical external and classical internal events only: the sword shall support its own weight when rested point down on the ground; a tassel may be attached to the pommel of the weapon.
  4. Broadsword and Southern Broadsword (Dao and Nandao)
    1. Both weapons shall be a singled-edged blade with slight convex curvature on the cutting edge.
    2. The point of the broadsword/southern broadsword shall not be lower than the top of the performer's shoulder when the broadsword is held, guard in hand.
    3. For contemporary external and contemporary internal events, the point of the broadsword/southern broadsword shall not be lower than the bottom of the performer's ear when the broadsword is held at side, guard in hand
    4. For classical external and classical internal events, the point of the broadsword/southern broadsword shall not be lower than the top of the performer's shoulder when the broadsword is held at side, guard in hand.

Specifications for Other Weapons

  1. All other Weapons must be Chinese in origin
  2. Weapons not allowed include, but are not limited to nunchuku, katana, manriki-gusari, kama, sai, etc.
  3. Examples of other acceptable Chinese weapons include but are not limited to:
    1. In the double weapons category: double broadsword, double straight sword, double hooks, etc.
    2. In the flexible weapon category: three section staff, single chain whip, rope dart, etc.
    3. In the open weapon category: guandao, pudao, tiger fork, two handed sword, fan, dagger, etc.

Deductions for Non-Conformity of Weapons

  1. In the event that the weapon's length fall short of the stated lengths, a deduction of 0.05 shall be made for each inch outside of specifications.
  2. In the event that the weapon obviously does not conform to the standards set out above in any way other than length, a deduction of 0.10 shall be made, at the discretion of the Chief Judge.
  3. In the event that the weapon is obviously not of Chinese origin, the performer shall have a total of 0.20 subtracted from the final score by the Chief Judge.

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III. TIME LIMITS

Contemporary Wushu

  1. Beginner Level, All Ages - 0:30 minimum
  2. Intermedaite Level All Ages - 1:00 minimum
  3. Advanced Level Changquan, Nanquan, All Ages - 1:20 minimum
  4. Advanced Level Jian, Dao, Gun, Qiang, All Ages - 1:20 minimum
  5. 42-Form Taijiquan - 5:00-6:00
  6. 42-Form Taijijian - 3:00-4:00
  7. Advanced Level Other or Optional Forms and Weapons - 1:00 minimum

Classical External (Traditional) Wushu

  1. Ages 5-12, All Levels All Forms - 0:30-2:00
  2. Beginner & Intermediate Level, Teen & Adult, All Forms - 0:30-2:00
  3. Advanced Level Teen & Adult, All Forms - 0:45-2:00

Classical Internal Wushu

  1. 24-Form Taijiquan - 4:00-5:00
  2. Yang, Chen, Wu, Hao, Sun Styles Taijiquan - 3:00-3:30
  3. Other Styles Taijiquan - 3:00-3:30
  4. Baguazhang - 1:00-2:00
  5. Xingyiquan - 1:00-2:00
  6. Taiji Straight Sword - 2:30-5:00
  7. Taiji Broadsword - 2:00-3:00
  8. Other Internal Weapons - 2:00-3:00

Group Forms and Sparring Sets

  1. Choreographed Sparring Sets: 0:45-2:00
  2. *For the Annual Collegiate Wushu Tournament, group set time limits are stated above in the "Group Set Event" section.

Deductions for Over/Under Time Limits

  1. In all cases, routines must violate the time limit by more than 0.09 seconds to be in violation, i.e. the time must be at least a tenth of a second off to be in violation, hundredths of a second don't count.
  2. Contemporary external styles - 0.10 points for each increment of 2.0 seconds over or under time limit.
  3. Classical (traditional) external styles - 0.10 points for each increment of 5.0 seconds over or under time limit.
  4. Internal style routines including 42-Taijiquan and 42-Taijijian - 0.10 points for each increment of 5.0 seconds over or under time limit
  5. Sparring sets - 0.10 points for each increment of 5.0 seconds over or under time limit
  6. *For the Annual Collegiate Wushu Tournament, group set time limit deductions are stated above in the "Group Set Event" section.

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IV. CRITERIA AND METHODS OF SCORING

  1. Skill Levels and Scoring Ranges
  2. General Method of Scoring
  3. Maximim Score Spreads
  4. Breaking Ties
  5. Scoring Criteria for Individual Forms Events

Individual Events are judged and scored as following according to the USWU rules:

A. Skill Levels & Scoring Ranges

  1. There will be no set range of scores pre-selected for any competition division, regardless of its designation as 'beginner', 'intermediate' or 'advanced' on registration materials.
  2. All competitors will be judged on a 6.0 - 10.0 scale.
  3. The score received from the judges will rate each competitor's skill level in each event.
  4. The following skill levels shall be associated with final scores received by
    1. 6.0 through 6.99 shall be beginner skill level, and shall be designated as 'C-Level.'
    2. 7.0 through 7.99 shall be intermediate skill level, and shall be designated as 'B-Level.'
    3. 8.0 through 8.99 shall be advanced level, and shall be designated as 'A-Level.'
    4. 9.0 through 9.99 shall be very-advanced level, and shall be designated as 'AA-Level'

B. General Method of Scoring

  1. Scoring by Judges: Scores shall be given by the Scoring Judges based on their evaluation of each competitor's technical execution of his routine, and according to the criteria for the specific event. The score shall be determined by subtracting points specified for errors from the value of points set for various factors. Scores displayed by the judges shall contain two digits after the decimal point, with the second digit being restricted to 0 or 5.
  2. Determination of the Merited Score: A competitor's merited score is the average of the middle three of the five scores given by the Scoring Judges. The merited score shall be truncated at two digits after the decimal point.
  3. Determination of the Final Score: A competitor's final score is determined by subtracting any points deducted by the Chief Judge from the merited score. The resulting total is the final score.

C. Maximum Score Spreads

  1. The Score-Keeper will determine the high and low score out of the five raw scores and find the difference between them.
  2. If the difference is 0.70 or more, the score-keeper will inform the Chief Judge so that she/he can call for a re-score.
  3. The Chief Judge will then instruct the Scoring Judges that they must re-score in an attempt to bring the scores within the acceptable range for maximum score spread.
  4. The Scoring Judges will then score the competitor again.
  5. The second set of scores shall stand, and shall be recorded as the competitor's scores, even if the scores still do not meet the required maximum score spread.

D. Breaking Ties

  1. If two competitors have the same final score, the tie between those two competitors will be broken in the following manner:
    1. The competitor whose mean (average) value of the two invalid (high and low that were dropped) scores is closer to the value of their original final score shall be placed higher.
    2. If the tie still remains, the competitor with the higher mean (average) value of the two invalid (dropped) scores will be placed higher.
    3. If the tie still remains, the competitor whose lower invalid (dropped) score is higher shall be placed higher.
  2. f the tie cannot be broken by any of the above m ethods, the tied competitors shall share the place, with the nex t place left vacant. So if the tied com petitors are tied for first place, the next place awarded to the next competitor down will be third.

E. Scoring Criteria for Individual Forms Events

  1. Technical Specifications of Performance: 6 points
  2. Demonstration of Power and Coordination of Movements: 2 points
  3. Elements of spirit, rhythm, content, structure and choreography: 2 points
  4. Additional deductions applied by Scoring Judges
  5. Deductions applied by the Chief Judge

The maximum points for any event is 10.0. The criteria for evaluation and deduction are as follows: 

  1. Technical Specifications of Performance: 6 points
    1. This category applies to hand/fist forms, stances, body positions, punching/striking techniques, footwork, body work, kicking and leg techniques, jumps, balances and weapon techniques (for weapons forms).
    2. Each occurrence of a slight deviation from correctness in any of the above areas shall result in a deduction of 0.05 point from the 6 point total.
    3. Each apparent deviation from correctness shall result in a 0.10 point deduction.
    4. Each serious deviation from correctness shall result in a 0.20 point deduction.
    5. The overall deduction shall not exceed 0.20 point for more than one error in the same movement, nor for repeated occurrence of the same habitual error.
    6. Deduction of points for the sharp edge of a weapon touching any body part shall be made in this category.
    7. Deduction of points for improper use if a weapon, for example, handling a straight sword no differently than a broadsword, shall be made from this category.
  2. Demonstration of Power and Coordination of Movements: 2 points
    1. Definitions of elements of this category:
      1. The full 2.0 points shall be awarded to those competitors who throughout their performance correctly demonstrate full power while properly coordinating application of power with body motion.
      2. If a competitor displays unnecessary muscle tension while punching, for example, the full 2 points cannot be given in this category. Likewise, if the hips, waist, and torso do not work together the judge must take deductions in this category.
    2. Deductions in this category shall be assigned as follows:
      1. A slight or occasional lack of power or coordination should result in a deduction of 0.1-0.5.
      2. An apparent or more frequent lack or power or coordination should result in a deduction of 0.6-1.0 points.
      3. A serious or repeated lack of power or coordination should result in a deduction of 1.1-1.5 points.
      4. A serious lack of both power and coordination shall result in a deduction of 1.6 to 2.0 points.
  3. Elements of spirit, rhythm, content, structure and choreography: 2 points
    1. Definitions of elements of this category:
      1. Spirit is the expression of martial intent through focus and intensity of the eyes.
      2. Rhythm is the control of the pace at which individual movem ents are performed. Each movement should be performed at the correct pace, whether slow or fast; pauses and accelerations should be distinctly displayed.
      3. Content refers to variety of techniques displayed within a routine. Ideally a routine should display a wide variety of techniques using all parts of the body.
      4. Structure refers to the cohesive flow from one movement or technique to the next. The sections or parts of the routine should transition smoothly and logically from one to the next, and not seem forced or awkward.
      5. Choreography is the arrangement or distribution of the routine within the competition area. A routine should make use of the majority of the competition space, and should move in a variety of directions within the ring.
    2. Deductions in this category shall be assigned as follows:
      1. A slight or occasional lack in one or two of the above elements should result in a deduction of 0.1-0.5 points.
      2. An apparent or more frequent lack in one or two elements, or a slight lack in three or more elements, should result in a deduction of 0.6-1.0 points.
      3. A serious or repeated lack of one or two elements, or an apparent lack in three or more elements should result in a deduction of 1.1-1.5 points.
      4. A serious or repeated lack of three of more elements should result in a deduction of 1.6-2.0 points.
  4. Additional deductions applied by Scoring Judges
    1. Forgetfulness:
      1. A pause affecting the harmony of movements shall result in a deduction of 0.1 point.
      2. A long pause shall result in a deduction of 0.2 point.
      3. A pause leading to confused movements shall result in a deduction of 0.3 point.
    2. Effects of costume/uniform or decorations on movements:
      1. In the process of competition, 0.1 point shall be deducted for each incident in which any part of the performer's body gets caught or entangled by the flags of his broadsword or the tassel of his sword, so as to affect his movements.
      2. 0.1 point shall be deducted for any weapon or garment decoration that falls off in the course of competition.
      3. 0.1 point shall be deducted for a competitor whose uniform tears, sash falls off, top comes open, shoe falls off, etc.
    3. Loss or breakage of weapon:
      1. Each occurrence of a weapon inappropriately touching a competitor's body or the floor, or coming loose from a competitor's hand, shall result in a deduction of 0.1 point.
      2. Each occurrence of a weapon becoming obviously bent or deformed shall result in a deduction of 0.2 point.
      3. Each occurrence of a weapon breaking or falling to the ground shall result in a deduction of 0.5 point.
    4. Loss of balance:
      1. Each loss of balance, indicated by sway of the body or superfluous step or skip, shall result in a deduction of 0.1 point.
      2. Repeated occurrences of loss of balance shall result in cumulative deductions.
      3. A loss of balance accompanied by a competitor touching the ground to support himself shall result in a deduction of 0.3 point.
      4. A loss of balance resulting in a fall to the ground shall result in a deduction of 0.5 point.
    5. Out of ring boundary will shall be enforced only when competition area is of the standard size for the particular event:
      1. Any part of the body trespassing the ring boundary shall result in a deduction of 0.1 point.
      2. The whole body trespassing the ring boundary shall result in a deduction of 0.2 point.
  5. Deductions applied by the Chief Judge
    1. Improper vocalizations in a routine shall result in a deduction of 0.1 point for each occurrence.
    2. Deviation in commencing and closing routine shall result in a deduction of 0.1 point.
    3. Repetition of performance:
      1. A competitor whose performance is interrupted by uncontrollable circumstances may repeat it with the Chief Judge's approval without deduction of points.
      2. A competitor whose performance is interrupted by a lapse of mem ory or damage to his weapon or costume may repeat his performance, but with a deduction of 1.0 point.
      3. If a competitor is not able to continue his performance due to injuries, the Chief Judge may stop the performance. The competitor, after receiving first aid and if he is able, shall be allowed to repeat his performance at the end of his group of competitors, but with a deduction of 1.0 point. If an injured competitor is unable to repeat his performance, he shall be considered to have forfeited for that division.
    4. Performance under and over the time limit specified for a particular division shall have such deductions applied as are mentioned previously
    5. Deviation from the designated direction for a particular movement in a compulsory or standard routine shall result in a deduction of 0.1 point for each occurrence.
    6. Missing or additional movements in a compulsory or standard routine:
      1. Each missing or additional movement shall result in a deduction of 0.2 point.
      2. Each missing or additional step in an approach to a jump or a sequence of steps shall result in a deduction of 0.1 point.
    7. Non-conformity with specifications for weapons and costumes shall be applied by the Chief Judge as specified previously.

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8. Nandu Individual Events

For the following events, we will use the IWUF 2005 rules for the judging and scoring:

  1. Nandu ChangQuan
  2. Nandu NanQuan
  3. Nandu TaijiQuan

Helpful links:


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9. General Format

**These rules are copied from USWU 2002 Rules and 2004 Rules Addendum unless otherwise specified.

CONTENTS

  1. Ring Officials
  2. Competition Area
  3. Competition Protocol


I. RING OFFICIALS

  1. Ring Coordinator
  2. Chief Judge
  3. Routine Examiner
  4. Scoring Judges
  5. Scorekeeper
  6. Timekeeper

The following officials will be used in all forms rings:

1. The Ring Coordinator shall

  1. Obtain a list of the competitors for each division
  2. Call competitors to the staging area and arrange them in the order of their performances.
  3. Lead the group of competitors into the ring for salute to the Chief Judge.
  4. Direct the group of competitors to the ring-side waiting area.
  5. Ensure an orderly progression of competitors into the ring for performance.
  6. At the close of the division, present group of competitors to Chief Judge for awards and salute.
  7. Lead competitors from the competition area.

2. The Chief Judge whose duties shall include:

  1. Overseeing the work of the Scoring Judges, Timekeeper and Scorekeeper, and generally ensuring smooth operation of his/her ring.
  2. Conduct the salute to competitors as they are presented prior to competition by the Ring Coordinator.
  3. Calling the next three competitors in the order that they will compete, as 'up', 'on-deck' and 'prepare.' If a competitor who is called to prepare is not present to compete due to competition in another ring, the chief judge shall call the next competitor in the order. The Chief Judge should then go back and call for the missing competitor as soon as possible, and avoid moving competitors to the end of the com petition order.
  4. Verification of the work of the Scorekeeper, Timekeeper and judges.
  5. The reading in a loud and clear manner, the scores of the judges to the Scorekeeper and audience.
  6. The resolution of excessive score variances.
  7. The reading in a loud, clear manner, the final score of all competitors.
  8. Being responsible for deductions of certain errors specified below. Note: The Chief Judge in a ring does not score the competitor.
  9. Having the final determination of whether a competitor has violated the rules short of an appeal to the chief arbitrator or head official of the tournament.
  10. Presenting awards to competitors at conclusion of the division.
  11. Conducting the salute to the competitors at the completion of the event.
  12. Reporting to the chief arbitrator or chief official when a judge departs from the rules or does not comply with his/her required duties.

3. The Routine Examiner who, for events in which compulsory or standard forms are required, shall:

  1. Observe the performance of the competitor, recording any movements that do not conform to the specifications of the compulsory routine.
  2. Upon completion of performance, tallies deductions of points for faults and reports such deductions to the Chief Judge and Scorekeeper.

4. The Scoring Judges (five) who shall:

  1. Apply the judging criteria to each competitor's performance in a fair and consistent manner to determine each competitor's score.
  2. Keep detailed written notes of each competitor's evaluation.

5. The Scorekeeper who shall:

  1. Record the names of all officials in his/her ring on each score sheet. The names of the Scoring Judges shall be recorded in the order that they sit around the ring starting with the Judge to the head table's right and proceeding around the ring in a counter-clockwise fashion.
  2. Inform the Chief Judge of the names of the next three competitors in the order that they will compete, so that the Chief Judge may call for them to prepare.
  3. Record the scores given by the five judges.
  4. Check that the spread of the scores is within the allowed range.
  5. Calculate the average merited score.
  6. Apply deductions as directed by the Chief Judge.
  7. Calculate the competitor's final score.
  8. Apply tie-break procedures, if necessary.
  9. Determine final placings for competitors in each division.

6. The Timekeeper who shall:

  1. Ensure that the stop watches are in working order and are set to the correct mode to record elapsed seconds.
  2. Ensure that the necessary awards for each division are on hand.
  3. Begin timing each competitor at the commencement of his routine, at the first sign of movement from this attention position; stopping the time when the form is finished and the competitor returns to a stationary and relaxed position.
  4. Report the duration of each competitor's routine to the Scorekeeper and the Chief Judge.
  5. Check that the time of each routine falls within the time limit specified in the rules for the type of routine, and inform the Chief Judge of any deviation.

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II. COMPETITION AREA

  1. Contemporary Wushu events shall be conducted in a competition area of 46 by 26 feet, carpeted if possible.
  2. **Group events shall be conducted on a 16 x 14 m or 52 x 46 ft carpet per IWuF rules.
  3. Classical Wushu events shall be conducted in a competition area of 36 by 26 feet.
  4. Each competition area shall be clearly marked to indicate the center of each longer side.
  5. The Chief Judges' table shall be placed along one of the longer sides of the competition area.
  6. The Scorekeeper, Timekeeper and routine examiner, if any, shall be seated at the Chief Judge's table.
  7. The Scoring Judges shall be arranged around the competition area, with judge number 1 located in the corner immediately to the right of the Chief Judge's table, judge 2 being in the next corner in a counterclockwise manner, judge 3 being directly opposite the Chief Judge's table, etc.

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III. COMPETITION PROTOCOL

  1. Staging
  2. Marching In
  3. Calling the Competitors
  4. Entering the Ring
  5. Beginning the Form
  6. Completing the Form
  7. Exiting the Ring
  8. Closing of the Division

Protocol for the competition events is as follows:

1. Staging

  1. In the staging area, the Chief Judge, Scorekeeper, Timekeeper, and Scoring Judges for the scheduled event shall assemble in preparation for marching in to the ring.
  2. Concurrently, in the staging area, the Ring Coordinator shall assemble and check-in the competitors for the scheduled event. Competitors who are not present shall be sum moned a last time before the division is started. Should a competitor have an obligation in another ring, he/she or his/her representative must at this time tell the ring officials so they can readjust the competing order to accommodate his or her other competing obligations. Once the event has started, if a competitor has not reported in and is not competing concurrently in another event, he/she will be excluded from the competing in the event.

2. Marching In

  1. The Chief Judge, Scorekeeper, Timekeeper, and Scoring Judges shall march into the ring and be seated. The names of these officials may be announced at this time.
  2. The Ring Coordinator shall lead the competitors into the ring and present them to the Chief Judge for the salute, then immediately lead the competitors to the ring-side waiting area. Competitors who are not concurrently competing in other events shall remain at ringside throughout the competition. The Ring Coordinator should at this time leave the ring to prepare the next group of competitors.

3. Calling the Competitors

  1. The Chief Judge will then announce the name of the first competitor, the next competitor 'on-deck' and the third competitor 'to prepare.'
  2. If a competitor is called three times after the event has begun, and there is no response, and that competitor is not in a concurrent division, that competitor will forfeit his/her right to com pete in the event.

4. Entering the Ring

  1. When the competitor's name is called, he/she will approach the ring and give a right fist and left palm salute (standing vertical with both feet together) to the Chief Judge only. The competitor shall not bow to any other ring official or it shall be considered a violation of protocol and will be dealt the appropriate deduction.
  2. The competitor will hold his/her hand salute until permission from the ring official is given. Upon receiving the signal form the ring official to enter the ring, the competitor will "march" or walk evenly and directly to his/her beginning position. No more than 5 seconds should be taken for this.
  3. At no point should the competitor speak to any officials or judges once his/her name is called.

5. Beginning the Form

  1. Once the beginning position is found, the competitor will stand perfectly still at attention, showing the judges and Timekeepers that the form is ready to begin.
  2. The time clock will begin at the first sign of movement from this attention position. This attention position should not be held for more than 5 seconds, however, it should be held for at least 2 seconds.

6. Completing the Form

  1. The time clock will stop when the form is finished and the competitor returns to a stationary and relaxed position.
  2. Upon completion, the competitor will again 'march' or walk evenly to the same place he/she entered, turn around, and face the judges and officials once again in a relaxed, upright positio

7. Exiting the Ring

  1. After receiving his or her final score, the competitor will acknowledge the score by saluting only the Chief Judge. Now the competitor is finished with his or her form, and may leave the ring area.
  2. Departures from this protocol will result in the appropriate penalty being deducted from the merited score of a competitor.

8. Closing of the Division

  1. At the conclusion of the final competitors' performance, the Scorekeeper and Chief Judge shall determine the placing of the competitors for awards.
  2. The Ring Coordinator will again lead the competitors into the ring and present them to the Chief Judge, who will, beginning with the lowest place, present the awards to the competitors.
  3. After the final award is presented, the competitors will all salute the Chief Judge and will be lead from the ring by the Ring Coordinator.

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10. Arbitration

**These rules are copied from USWU 2002 Rules and 2004 Rules Addendum unless otherwise specified.

CONTENTS

  1. Definitions
  2. Arbitration Procedure


I. DEFINITIONS

A. Arbitration

An arbitration is a matter officially and properly submitted to the arbitrator for  investigation and rendering of a decision. The decision of the arbitrator is final and binding. 

B. Arbitrator

The arbitrator is an individual, impartial to the outcome of the proceedings,  who is empowered to examine the facts and render a decision. This official is separate from all other officials of the tournament. 

C. Who May Request Arbitration

A competitor who believes that there was an irregularity in applying the rules  to his or her own performance may request. The competitor's coach or designated representative may apply on behalf of the competitor only if the competitor is incapacitated. 

D. What May be the Subject of Arbitration

1. Matters that are eligible for arbitration include errors of administration,  procedure, or fact. Examples of matters which may be arbitrated include, registrar errors, enrollment in the incorrect division, misidentification of an athlete, incorrectly recorded scores, mathem atical errors, tim ing signals incorrectly presented, interference from events or persons outside the ring, and actions of a judge inappropriate to his/her duties. 

2. Matters that are not eligible for arbitration include requests with regard to  another athlete's match or performance. Nor may any athlete request reexamination of his/her match or performance with the purpose of obtaining a  different score or evaluation. In fairness to all athletes, scores must be given by the judges based on their observation during the actual match or performance and from their particular vantage point, within the general framework of the tournament in progress. 

3. The request for arbitration shall be made in good faith. Only one person may  sign a request for arbitration. The writer must adhere to matters of facts that can be proven, and avoid matters of opinion. The request for arbitration must state clearly and specifically what error is believed to have been committed, who committed it, and what action or changes are being sought. 

E. Time Limit for Requesting Arbitration

Generally, the initial complaint must be presented to the Chief Judge  immediately after the occasion or incident for which arbitration will be requested. 

  1. Prior to the end of the competition division, the competitor must notify the Chief Judge of the event that a formal arbitration request will be submitted.
  2. The Chief Judge will then notify all competitors of a delay in final results, pending the arbitration.
  3. The written arbitration request must be submitted within two hours following the individual's performance.

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II. ARBITRATION PROCEDURE

A. Notification of Impending Arbitration

The athlete, his/her coach, or a designated representative must first inform the  Chief Referee of the division of the intent to submit a request for arbitration. 

B. Submitting a Request

The athlete, his/her coach, or a designated representative, submits a written  request and the appropriate fee. Verbal requests are not accepted. The request must clearly state what particular error he/she believes was committed and what action or resolution is desired. 

C. Payment of Fee

The arbitration fee of $100 deposit in cash must be presented with the  request. If the decision favors the competitor, the fee is refunded. 

D. Investigation

The arbitrator investigates the matter described in the request. The arbitrator  may review the official records, examine equipment, and interview any persons involved in an official capacity with the event or action noted in the arbitration request, including the competitor, the Chief Judge or Referee, Scoring Judges, Timekeeper, Scorekeeper, Ring Coordinators, routine examiners, opponents in the match, and others as necessary. 

E. Decision

The arbitrator states his/her findings and decision in writing, responding to the  specifics of the m atter requested. The decision is final and binding on all parties involved. 

F. Confidentiality

All matters of arbitration are treated as confidential by the officials involved.


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11. Disqualification

To encourage a fair tournament, a strict disqualification policy is in effect.

  1. Failure to bring valid documents to prove eligibility will result in that competitor's disqualification from the tournament.
  2. Dishonesty reporting of years of training (skill level) will result in disqualification.
  3. Dishonesty reporting student status will result in ineligibility to compete for 1 year. Any medals won during the competition during which dishonesty occurred will be stripped from the competitor.
  4. If the dishonest competitor also participated in the team competition, the school will be barred from team competition for 1 year. The team's results will be nullified and any medals won in the team competition during which the dishonesty occurred will be stripped from the team.
  5. A disqualified team member causes his or her entire team to be disqualified from the team competition (non-disqualified team members are still eligible to compete in individual competition).
  6. A competitor can also be disqualified for cheating, unsportsmanlike behavior, or a failure to accord proper respect and courtesy towards the judges, tournament staff, fellow competitors, or instructors present at the competition.
  7. Disqualifications will be made official by the tournament's judge general.

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